Podcasts for Cabdrivers.

Spoon's podcasts for Taxi Stockholm reach drivers where and how they work: behind the wheel, listening to the radio.

Spoon's Johan Bratt and Emily Asserbäck flank Taxi Stockholm's Natalia Santos and Martina Bennarp
Spoon's Johan Bratt and Emily Asserbäck flank Taxi Stockholm's Natalia Santos and Martina Bennarp

It all began in a taxi.

“I sat in a taxi on my way from a customer that we help with their internal communication,” says Johan Bratt, customer manager at Swedish content agency Spoon. “I started thinking about how Taxi Stockholm could reach its drivers, who spend their days in the car, and I came up with the idea of a podcast as a channel for internal communication. Since so many taxi drivers listen to the radio, the idea of doing a podcast seemed like a natural.”

Taxi Stockholm wasn’t a customer of Spoon, which provides editorial communication in a variety of print and digital formats to a wide range of companies. But that didn’t stop Bratt, who managed to convince Taxi Stockholm to accept a meeting. “You have to have a very strong idea, something completely new,” he says, when it comes to pitching an idea cold to a company.

Which obviously was definitely the case with podcasts for Taxi Stockholm. Spoon has contracted with the company to produce monthly 20-minutes episodes that include interviews in “the studio” – a conference room at Taxi Stockholm headquarters – as well as reporting in the field with taxi drivers.

Bratt and Emily Asserbäck, who serves as the host for the podcast, come up with the original ideas that Taxi Stockholm approves. Once approved and interviews and reports are made, it’s all put together with transitional music added, edited and mixed by Spoon. The podcast then goes to Taxi Stockholm for their comments before a final edit is made. Taxi Stockholm then puts the sound file up on its intranet, which works also with smart phones, tablets and other wireless devices.

Bratt believes that podcasts can be a great tool not just for internal communication but also as an external channel. “Companies that are market leaders or have a lot of knowledge about their business area can have podcasts that showcase their expertise,” he says. “The smaller the industry, the easier to do a podcast that’s truly relevant for a target group. Take the Taxipod as an example: it’s totally incomprehensible for anyone who doesn’t work within Taxi Stockholm, but super relevant for those who do.”

Published Monday, October 07, 2013 in

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